Blind dating for teen girls

Teenagers in the 1950's are so iconic that, for some, they represent the last generation of innocence before it is "lost" in the sixties.

When asked to imagine this lost group, images of bobbysoxers, letterman jackets, malt shops and sock hops come instantly to mind.

She then is given the option of accepting his call by letting him in or rejecting it by making up an excuse as to why she cannot see him.

Refreshments were often served (though not always), and the entertainment was primarily piano playing in the parlor.

Dating had actually been around for a while before the 1950's, but since the presence of the teenager became ever more prevalent and public, dating became more and more popular and routinized.

Millions of teenagers in the 1950's went on one or more dates per week. If a girl of thirteen years had not started dating yet, she was considered a "late bloomer" by societies standards (Bailey 48).

One of the conventions they put a new spin on, and consequently revolutionize, is the idea and practice of dating.

COURTING IN THE 1950's During the 1950's, it was common knowledge, at least to girls, that there was a process to the whole courtship ritual -- that there were stages to a lasting relationship.

Images like these are so classic, they, for a number of people, are "as American as apple pie." They are produced and perpetuated by the media, through films like .

Because of these entertainment forums, these images will continue to be a pop cultural symbol of the 1950's.

First, when you are young, you associate with boys in the playground, and do not seriously form any romantic relationships with them.

Then you progress to flirting and talking to them which leads into dating.

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