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A small amount of residential accommodation was also provided for several employees including the overseers of the weaving and clothworking shops.The workhouse was run by several "undertakers" — local clothiers, appointed by the Corporation, who organised the cloth production for which they received loans from the common stock.The lodging rooms contain 2, 3,4 beds apiece, made of flocks and feathers. If they require more they are usually taken into the house. Its operation was overseen by an elected Board of Guardians, 15 in number, representing its 3 constituent parishes as listed below (figures in brackets indicate numbers of Guardians if more than one): Berkshire: St Giles, with Whitley (5); St Lawrence, Reading (5); St Mary, with Southcot (5).

Finally, in 1865, a site was bought for a new workhouse on the north side of the Oxford Road near Battle Farm. The workhouse site was finally handed back to the Board of Guardians in 1920.

The plans were revised in January 1867 to add an extra storey to the infirmary, adding £430 to the price. Two nurses were on duty at night-time, and pauper assistance was confined to activities such as cleaning and bed-making. In 1909-11 an additional infirmary block was added at the north of the site for up to 150 aged, infirm and convalescent patients. All the inmates were transferred to other workhouses in the area, and the infirmary patients moved to Grovelands School nearby. The cross-shaped main building contained an administrative block, wards and cells, together with a labour yard and labour master's house. The hospital finally closed in 2005 and the buildings have been demolished except for the gatehouse and board-room.

The total cost, including furniture and fittings, was in the region of £14,000. In addition, a new board room, administrative block and master's house were added. Within six weeks, the workhouse was transformed into the Reading Number One War Hospital which, linked together with more than twenty other auxiliary hospitals in Berkshire, constituted one of the country's biggest war hospitals. In 1849, the Reading Union joined with the neighbouring Wokingham Union to form the Reading & Wokingham School District and operated a residential school for pauper children at Gargrave until the early 1900s.

[Up to 1834] [After 1834] [Staff] [Inmates] [Records] [Bibliography] [Links] In December 1624, Reading received a bequest of £8,400 in the will of wealthy London draper John Kendrick.

The money was designated for several causes but the bulk, £7,500, was to establish a workhouse.

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